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The “Wait Until 8th” Pledge – Let Kids be Kids a little longer…

The Wait Until 8th pledge empowers parents to rally together to delay giving children a smartphone until at least 8th grade.  By banding together, this will decrease the pressure felt by kids and parents alike over the kids having a smartphone. 

Why Wait?

There is a reason why top Silicon Valley executives are saying no to the smartphone until high school for their children. In fact, there is a long list of reasons and parents need to know them.

SMARTPHONES ARE ADDICTIVE

New research shows dependence on your smartphone may produce some of the same addictive brain responses similar to alcohol, drug and gambling addictions. Smartphones are like slot machines in your children’s pocket constantly persuading them to crave more. The tech industry intentionally designs smartphone apps and social media for people to use for long periods of time because this is how they make their money.

SMARTPHONES ARE AN ACADEMIC DISTRACTION

Elementary and middle school years establish the foundation for your child’s academic success. Children learn how to productively manage time, projects and homework. Introducing a constant distraction with a smartphone is paving a path for academic mediocrity. Studies show that after a child receives a smartphone the child’s grades are likely to suffer. Another study found that children who attend schools with smartphone bans did better on tests.

SMARTPHONES IMPAIR SLEEP 

Studies show that the use of smartphones and other portable devices with screens affects the quantity and quality of sleep in children and teens. Adolescents are likely restless because they anticipate receiving texts and social media messages from friends, which affects their nighttime routine. Some children even wake up in the middle of the night to check texts or social media. Sleep disturbance in childhood is known to have adverse effects on health, including poor diet, obesity, weakened immune system, stunted growth, and mental health issues.

SMARTPHONES INTERFERE WITH RELATIONSHIPS 

Many parents regret allowing their child to have a smartphone because they have experienced the way the smartphone is destructive to relationships. The parent child relationship suffers. Children are often inattentive with the constant distraction the phone brings. Face to face relationships dwindle as children shift their time and energy to investing in their online “friendships.”

SMARTPHONES INCREASE THE RISK FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Children are not emotionally equipped to navigate tricky social media waters at such an early age.  Viewing someone else’s highlight reel on social media often leads youth to think they are missing out or are not enough compared with their peers. Research shows that the more time someone uses social media the more likely they are to be depressed.

In addition, when children overuse technology, the constant stimulation of the brain causes the hormone cortisol to rise. Too much cortisol can inhibit a child from feeling calm. The loss of tranquility can lead to serious anxiety orders.

SMARTPHONES PUT YOUR CHILD AT RISK FOR CYBER BULLYING 

Bullying is no longer limited to the playground or locker room. Bullies seek to harm children through social media and texts often making retreat for the victim impossible. The most common medium used for cyber bullying is the phone. Nearly 43% of children have been bullied online. Only one in 10 victims will inform a parent or trusted adult of their abuse.

 SMARTPHONES EXPOSE CHILDREN TO SEXUAL CONTENT 

Smartphones have enabled children to view pornography anywhere.  Pornography marketers intentionally target youth online to lure them to dangerous images and videos. One study showed that 42% of online youth users have been exposed to online pornography. Of those, 66% reported unwanted exposure to pornography often through online ads.

Not only are children viewing sexual content with their phones but they are creating it as well.  More and more children are “sexting” (sending sexual text messages and or explicit images).  Also, various apps open the doors to sexual predators seeking to track, groom and harm our children.

 TECHNOLOGY EXECUTIVES BAN SMARTPHONES FOR THEIR CHILDREN 

According to a New York Times piece, many technology executives wait until their child is 14 before they allow them to have a phone. While these teenagers can make calls and text, they are not given a data plan until 16. If leaders of digital giants like Google, eBay, Apple and Yahoo are delaying the smartphone then should this not give us pause?  Executives that flourish on the success of technology are protecting their children from the smartphone. Should we not do the same?

To learn more, visit: https://www.waituntil8th.org

186 Comments

  1. Our kids did not get cell phones until they got their drivers licenses. There was no good reason for them to have them before the that.

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    • Agree. We only got one phone and whoever was driving got to have it at that time.

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    • I’m with ya on that one! 👍🏽 And I’d be ok if I get my sons a basic old school flip phone that just dials out in case of emergency. Otherwise, kids don’t “need” smartphones.

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      • Absolutely! They should sell old flip phones precisely for this reason!!

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        • They do still sell flip phones. That is what I use. Unlimited text and calls for $25 a month.

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          • Trisha – what phone and plan do you have? I want our “family phone” (it’s used by the family member that needs it at the time) to have unlimited talk and text for communication purposes (currently it’s limited and costing too much). My 13 yr old said the other day he doesn’t want a smartphone because he sees the affects it’s having on his friends.

      • Sadly it’s hard to find anything except smart phones anymore and finding a phone that’s good for someone not up on today’s tech is just as hard.

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    • When they can pay for it themselves. Monthly payment and all.

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      • Yup! That is what I did with my three kiddos

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        • im never letting my kids have smartphones, only boring flip phones, like i have.

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      • I almost said that to my 9 year old but with the odd jobs he does (flyers, dog walking) he actually could pay the bill so I had to be careful with my explanations 🙂

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        • Haha! Don’t you hate that. :/

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      • LOL! That’s the deal my parents made with me about having a motorcycle. Then I rode them for the next 45 years.

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      • be careful what you wish for… that is how I got a 6 foot boa constrictor…. by saying “when you can buy your own” to a 6 year old who wanted a snake…..1st checks from paper route at 12.

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        • I’m sorry that you allowed the devil into your home. I told my children as long as you are under my roof NO SNAKES OF ANY KIND. I told then that anything but any type of reptile would be welcomed and that was that. Now both are grown and have children of their own and they told them the same thing. GOD Does give us what we ask for if ask in for in the right attitude.

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      • That’s what we did with our kids! I don’t think they ever lost one either because they had to pay for Peggy

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    • I couldn’t agree more!!

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    • I got my kid a flip phone (with no internet access) when she was 10. It took care of the need for communication without exposing her to the risks associated with social media. She wouldn’t have gotten it so early if she wasn’t traveling out-of-state with her drama club. I wanted her to have a way to contact the group if she got separated, or call home if there was an emergency.

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    • Replied and find this website not operating for a reply/comment
      Good luck to parents swimming upstream!

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      • We have to swim upstream for a lot of things. Parenting is hard, and if we take the easy options, we will reap what we sow. It’s not our job to be their friends/popular, it’s our job to set limits and teach them.

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        • Yes exactly! That’s how I feel about a lot of “parents” these days. They try to be their child’s friend vs being their parental figure. I have a son and daughter ages 6 & 2. They BOTH know their way around a tablet or smartphone but they will not receive one of their own until they have their driver’s license and even then if they’re not acing in school or hold at least a B average they won’t have their license or phone until their grades are brought up. This world is a crazy place to live these days and it truly frightens me to think of what us older people are leaving to our children and grandchildren. Praying for the right kind of change not just for our country but for the world.

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    • My kids are 8 & 11. My kids found RoBlox on the PC. My daughter thought she was talking to a kid. It turned out to be a 30 year old lady. I tell her about the dangers. Do you need college education? No. You need the Bible and some common sense. Kids mimic adults. I don’t want my kids to cuss but they heard it somewhere. We have to support each other. Be careful. My kids will be much older when they get data phone. Emergency phones are good cuz there are no pay phones. I put my oldest in private school cuz she has hard time with Math. My youngest is doing well in public school for now.

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      • Your children will know your advice is ridiculous when they apply for decent jobs and tell the interviewer they have a Bible instead of a college education.

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        • Then, that’s definitely NOT the job for them! Any employer who doesn’t value the promise that this is a future employee with a heart for Jesus will not provide a work place that is conducive to a Christian workforce, then that is not the job for you! Keep on looking but never disguise your love for love!

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          • Yeahhhh, sorry I’d rather have a doctor with a college education than a Bible.

          • Yeahh. Yeah no. You can read the bible and also not be a moron at the same time.

          • Why do you assume that a Christian can’t continue to be one while earning a college degree?

          • I know any number of good employers that provide a positive work place and a positive work force that may or may not have Christian beliefs because they value *all* people, even those with divergent beliefs, and don’t impose their religious beliefs on their work force. They hire good people and good workers with good morals and good values and good work ethics, right alongside excellent training, education, and smarts, religious beliefs notwithstanding.

        • Well said! Im glad someone said it.

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          • That was for Patricia Fox there.

        • Well said! to Patricia Fox.

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        • Well, I am thankful we have a new brother and sister in Christ. Teach basic Bible, true life will be given

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        • You do not need a college education to be gainfully employed and successful. Have you ever heard of the trades. Clearly, you haven’t been brought up with any diversity. Your path is not necessarily the right path for others. The Bible, however, will teach you many things you would never learn in college as evidenced by your hateful and judgmental comment to somebody else’s differing opinion.

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          • Even if you have a job in the trades, you need education beyond high school. I want the guy who does the wiring on my house to go to electrician school. I want my plumber to know what he’s doing, and I want the person working on my car to be educated on different models of cars. And seriously, you would discourage your kid from getting a college education because she would need to read more than the Bible? Seriously?

          • Why couldn’t they have both??! Shoot for the stars!♡♡

        • I support kids having BOTH a bible. AND a college education.😎

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      • Does that mean that you think private schools are better in math than public schools???? I want you to know that I am personally tutoring private school students in math and my colleague who is also a math teacher, is also tutoring private school students in math. Our public school math department ROCKS!!!

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          • Hey, Mark S, don’t be rude, there’s no reason to tell ANYONE to shut up. Except for maybe yourself… :/ (believe me, I didn’t want to say this :C)

      • I am thinkin you should home school your children…you’re mastery of english is profound

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        • *your

          Proof-read your comment if you’re going to post a snarky reply.

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          • There is nothing wrong with homeschooling your children. I homeschool (secular, as I am not Christian). I have 3 degrees plus a minor. That being said, teaching only the Bible will greatly impair children when it is time for them to go to college or join the adult world.
            Furthermore (Karen), this is not a Christian nation, we are all free to practice our religion of choice and that choice should not be a basis for getting a job.

      • Amen to the Bible…2Timothy 3:16,good job Cat.

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        • Sad that we are all so concerned about our kids behavior/safety online, but have no concern for our own. If you see a comment you disagree with, why not just move on?

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          • Excellent point!

      • I am 38 and actually have a Roblox account that I use often. I got it so that I can play with my kids and monitor who is interacting with them, but I do also play on my own as well because I have made friends with other adults who are on for the same or similar reasons.

        My kids are 8, 10, and 12 and are in virtual school, which I have found to be a great blend of public school (set curriculum, teachers to monitor their work and progress) and home schooling (open schedule, no bullying, way more flexibility).

        My kids do not have phones, but when they do need them, they will have a flip phone and we will monitor their usage closely. People may think we are overprotective, but it is our job to teach ad raise our children and to protect them from the bad stuff until they are old and wise enough to handle it.

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    • I agree!!! Until then, phones are available at school and at home for contacting parents. And that is all!

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    • YES. This. So grateful to see that others get this, too! That’s when I got a phone, and just to let you play detective….it was a big BRICK!! LOL. I really want to hold out that long for our son, too.

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    • Well, unfortunately that’s not true. My children have always been involved in sports, theatre, Scouts and after school activities as well as had friends to visit. Unfortunately sometimes things happen that require a child to call home -even if it’s simply not being comfortable in the situation. My children were eighth and twelfth grade when we returned to the US from an overseas post where we’d been for most of their lives…. and it was so safe an environment that it brought to mind Mayberry and Happy Days – except it was reality. Returning to the States unfortunately meant we had to worry about bullies, school shootings, parents who might not STAY at home when a teen was visiting, and other dangers. My daughter had a flip phone in eighth grade for MY piece of mind; she still has the flip phone three years later.

      Most of these concerns are true of ANYTHING that has Internet access… whether at home or away from home and this includes many mp3 players.

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      • We’re not talking about flip phones here. We’re talking about Smart Phones.

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    • I do AGREE WITH ALL these reasons why a young CHILD OR TEEN should WAIT to have a SMART PHONE. There is a difference giving a child a pop up phone ONLY for emergencies, but a child having a smart phone does create all that has been stated. I have 3 children and my last was brought up with the pressures of a child having a phone. She is addicted to it and has definitely had issues with relationships, bullying and self esteem because of it. Access to all what the internet has, is TOO MUCH for developing minds and definitely are inluenced in a way that may not be positive. It’s hard enough for us adults to weed out the negativity and keep true and positive to ourselves. Young kids are trying to find themselves and the energy a smart phone gives kids, hasn’t been fruitful.

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    • Good for you. I admire your judgement. gret

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    • I got mine at 16 and I’m glad I did I wasn’t missing out sure I use it now but also delete social media apps all the time and know their is more to life than a phone

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    • I like that idea too! I hope I can say no until he’s 15!

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    • I agree but the smatphone is the problem with data access. Using a (flip) phone for communication is important to me because my children are empowered to walk to school, practices etc and I need contact.

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    • I agree however it’s the access to a smartphone with data ability that’s the issue. I do not see a problem with a (flip style) phone for communication piece as I empower my children to walk to school, sports, etc and I like the ability to check on them.

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    • Me too! The phone went with the car, not with us.

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    • My kids were given “dumb” phones to text and call with and no internet access in 8th grade and get Smart phones when they turn 18. They have other technologies to use like ipads. They complain, but we live in a small town and they aren’t the only ones without.

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    • No good reason? I can think of a ton! I used to walk home in 5th grade and I would have felt so unsafe if I did not have any sort of communication device like a phone. It wasn’t a smart phone and I couldn’t send more than 100 texts (to my family), but honestly when you say they have to wait for a drivers license you are relying on other parents to have given their kids phones. Otherwise how will your kid call you to get picked up? Or call in an emergency? I didn’t get a smartphone until high school and I bought it myself but saying there is no reason to have one before then seems a little funny to me.

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  2. I’m in to protect my children…to keep them young..

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  3. My boys didn’t have phones until 16. I think it is why they still enjoy being outside-however, I wish they used tech less!!
    I personally use my phone/computer too much and am working to cut way back on screen time. Adults have tech addictions!
    I think it would be best if these devices be used on a limited basis until at least high school.

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  4. Technology – the double-edged sword. I will not give my son a data plan cell phone until at least high school. Can’t say the same about his dad, though.
    My boy is in 1st grade now and uses my old iPhone to connect to his learning apps – Spanish, Math, and Science games for kids. His dad also gave him his old phone to use while at his house but it is loaded with mindless addictive games. I’m sure we’re gonna fight about when to give him a data cell phone as he gets older, too.

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  5. Every child is different. Hand your kid a phone and you should be willing to do the work to monitor it w software and daily conversations. There is not one size fits all parenting rules. The Bible the only standard we follow. My kids have had smartphones since they were 11. It can be a weapon if not monitored. We’ve had our issues but who’s to say depriving them of a phone will make your kid a better 16 year old.? We know a lot of messed up homeschooled, sheltered kids that are messed up. All these issues existed before smartphones did.

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    • And i know alot of unsheltered public schooled kids that are messed up (i was one of them) and i homschooled an intelligent, sheltered (whithin reason) innocent little girl who acts way less sassy and more her age, since i pulled her from p.s. She is returning to public school after 3 years homeschooled, as a much kinder and more confident child, then if she were to have stayed in public school, where she was bullied and torn down by her peers, and teacher and made to feel worthless 😕so there is no need to dis homeshoolers..the majority of homeschooled kids i know are very well rounded, highly intelligent, socially adept children. Im not trying to dis you but it was very rude to highlight homeschooled kids in a negative light..not ALL homeschooled kids are as you perceive them to be…JS…

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      • Rachel, she didn’t say that all homeschooled children are like that. She simply stated that a lot of the homeschool children they know are, and I for one have had the same experience. Not all homeschooled children have the ability to be around as many other children or go through the same experiences that public school children do. It’s a doubt edge sword because there are a lot of benefits of being able to home school your children as well.

        I am in agreement that issues children go through have always existed, the exact issue is the only thing that changes with the times. Years from now smart phones won’t be the “target” but something newer, yet it still will remain an “issue” or “problem” for that generation of society to deal with.

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      • Public schools are not the problem…. it is society!!!!!!

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        • THANK YOU. Don’t know if you’re a fellow P.S. educator, parent, both, or none of the above, but your support is appreciated! 😊

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      • Amen! We homeschool and our kids don’t have phones. They are super social…they communicate with others! Especially with adults, kind and encouraging with younger children, and creative, fun, and engaging with peers. Kids don’t “need” phones. We didn’t.

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    • Your response is GOLDEN!

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    • Hmm, well I grew up Christian, it didn’t work well and I really wish people would teach world religion. But, not everyone wants to listen to someone that wants others to expand their mind. However, I was 16 when I got online, and i hear horror stories about kids seeing stuff on youtube and doing it themselves. I wonder if people even pay attention to such warnings or poo poo it as something that MY child will never do!

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    • I hear what you’re saying and that double edge sword is real. Responsible kids is the goal obviously, how we get them there is a trick.

      The part about access to the data smartphone is the worry, as much as I supervise my son it’s a real concern. He is very responsible with it but the addictive piece can you leave wiring the brain is there. It’s an ongoing battle and like all of us we just want to do the right thing for children. Like all of us we continue to try to do it works for us with the hopes of having responsible adults in our world.

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  6. I am a proud parent of an eight year old who has a smart phone.
    For every study completed there is another with conflicting information and different conclusion in contrast to the other findings. Do not blame tech, blame caviler underdeveloped parenting skills.
    My child sleeps better then any child/guest I have had over for a sleep over,demonstrates great behavior at School and excels in his academics. He was also promoted a grade level higher in his Elementary School. What a joke.Any child that demonstrates premature sexual interest simply reflects poor parenting.Most of these Moms are the age of Forty or more and do not have any education on computer science or tech professionally or otherwise. You can download photos and email them.Kids are addicted to I pads that have a camera as well.You can track,block and receive notifications of your child’s online activity.Every child should have emergency access to 911. with all the “Stranger danger” Moms complain about they seem ignorant and counterproductive. In addition, How can any respectable parent leave their child under the care of a babysitter without them having the aid of a cell phone? What concerned “good” Moms. What a joke. Nanny cams are faulty and can also be covered up.If you distrust your troubled child and think she/he would abuse a phone because you have caviler parenting incapabilities and would use their phone for bad activity vs the greater good that is a sad personal problem. In addition with the ignorance here, Let us not forget about the child who recorded a hate crime, bullying on a bus that led to prosecution. (Bloomfield Hills Mi Phoenix Williams.) And the young student who saved a fellow student’s life who had a peanut allergy by calling 911! These uneducated Moms need to keep their non professional opinion to themselves. I judge them likewise for having a child that would abuse a phone.Let your kids flourish and grow. My education and accomplishments are : Former LPN, Paralegal and Law student. Husband/spouse holds a Masters degree of Computer Science.

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    • Wow. Pretty judgemental. I am over 40, have a college degree, work with technology/social media every day for my job (so I’m not ignorant of it by any means), and have had every problem on this list with my teen girl. No matter what limitations we put in her way, she found a way around them. Took the phone away entirely, and she acquired another. Or used her friends’. I don’t appreciate being referred to as an uneducated parent or having my parenting skills questioned.

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      • Wow, eight is entirely too young. You’re kidding yourself.

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        • I agree! Her post, literally, made me laugh out loud. She is so clueless – I’d love to check back in with her in about 10 years! lol I’m a 45 year old, COLLEGE EDUCATED, mother of 4 teenagers – 19, 17, 16 and 15 – though I had NO IDEA you needed a college education to be a good, loving, involved or decent parent. She has A LOT to learn, and I’m not talking about a college education. An 8 year old child has absolutely no need for a smart phone. If they spend time with a sitter or in day care or go back in forth between divorced parents, then get them a simple cell phone for emergencies – absolutely no need for a smart phone. When they are at home you can supervise them on the iPad with their apps and educations games. All of our kids got smart phones in middle school. Yes, technology can be great, but you HAVE to constantly monitor your kids. I’m that mom that follows my kids and their friends on ALL social media and my husband and I have the passwords to all of their social media accounts. If they change a password and I don’t have access then they lose their phone. Even with high school kids you have to be vigilant in monitoring them and checking their social media. And if you think any kid, no matter their age, hasn’t seen porn on their smartphone, you are seriously fooling yourselves.

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      • EXACTLY!!! I Am 43, a mother of 4, I have a college degree, a master’s degree, and I am a teacher… this post is extremely judgmental!!! I have two kids in college and 2 kids in elementary… my kids are great!!! Every child is different!!!!! My 6th grader still does not have a phone… I have seen what smart phones do to kids. I teach middle school…

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      • I’m over 65, college educated, computer proficient. When my grandkids are here every week, we have a no tech day. No games except board, no contests except hide & seek. We go to the park, swim, cook. No complaints so far. They love coming for Nana/Papa day every week. Ipads at school, that’s their parents’s problem. Tech is here to stay, just need to set limits

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    • That’s wonderful….but your kid is eight. Maybe wait a little while before climbing on your high horse to sprinkle the rest of us with your sanctimony. Thanks.
      – an RN,BSN that has worked in pediatrics for over a decade and mother of 3.

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      • Please note it says former student. Doesn’t mean anything. A smartphone at eight is just a damn ass move.

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      • I’d ask everyone on here to abstain from responding meanly to a comment but respond in an educational way. This post talks about delaying giving our children cell phones with cyber bullying being one of those reasons. You may not like what a person says or you may feel attacked by what they say. Instead of attacking back, try responding in a respectful and educational way and see how the conversation can change. We can all learn from one another when we are open to listening to other views and speaking respectfully.

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    • You do know there are phones that can call and text but don’t have the “smart phone” options, right? I absolutely agree a way to instantly call for help is priceless, but the apps and social media are not necessary at such a young age. The lengthy, judgmental, angry rant REEKS of guilt.

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    • and yet, until very recently, people actually grew up without any cell phone or smart tech. we managed to survive.

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      • Recently…really??? might want to check your calendar. just sayin’

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      • Yeah, and in that world there were pay phones all over and everyone was in the same boat, so things were generally planned out much more concretely in advance.

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    • My question to you is why. Do you leave your child unattended? Why? Is you child not with an adult at school, after school? My 3 kids, hell I did not have a cell phone. My kids got one when they were old enough to be without an adult….about 15 or 16. Before then they were always with an adult. School, babysitter, me. When exactly does your 8 year old “Need a cellphone” if they are without adult supervision then analyze your decisions. Also….. let us know who this goes at 12 – 13…. Best wishes but seriously you need to chill. You have NO IDEA whats coming!

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    • If you’re going to brag, about yourself proofread whay you have written. Typically I would not mess with you about something as small as saying “then” where there should be a “than”, but given that you seem so hostile, belligerent, and personally attacking other’s intelligence and bragging about your accomplishments I will… The fun pay is that since you were or are a paralegal you should have caught it.. This indicates that either you are not a good proofreader, or that you yourself are ignorant as to which one to use. I find the latter hilarious as you make claims that all these other women are ignorant, and then show ignorance….. I LAUGH IN THE FACE OF IGNORANCE, MUAH HAHAHHAHA!

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      • ha ha: If you’re going to brag, about yourself proofread whay you have written.

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        • lol… you messed up in your putt down

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          • *put

            So did you…

    • I have no idea how your lpn and law education somehow makes you an authority on childhood development. Your comments are pretty judgmental. Hope you are as confident in your parenting when your kid turns 13..it’s a whole different show then. Good luck from the >40 yr pediatric emergency physician who daily cares for the kids of overconfident parents.

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      • LOVE THIS RESPONSE!!!

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    • Perhaps these words have not yet been covered in LPN or Law School, but I think you meant cavalier instead of caviler.

      caviler
      a person given to harsh judgments and to finding faults the chronic cavilers who are going to complain no matter what the mayor does
      Synonyms carper, castigator, critic (or caviller), censurer, criticizer, disparager, faultfinder, hypercritic, knocker, niggler, nitpicker

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    • Over forty and don’t know anything about technology? Ahahahaha. Yea, ok. Keep telling yourself that. My generation is the one that grew up learning how to socialize with each other, in person, instead of just on a phone. We also learned the technology as it was invented and improved. I doubt you are any more tech savvy than I am. There are homes that still have landlines for your ‘babysitter’ issue. If you don’t think that kids know how to work around every single one of those parental blocks you are speaking of, you are delusional.

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    • Your post is full of spelling and grammar errors. It doesn’t speak well of you to judge others and brag about your education in this manner. It sounds as if you are very defensive. If what you are doing works for your family, then, by all means, go with it. Other parents choosing something differentl doesn’t make their parenting skills less than yours.

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    • I agree with most of what you said, however, one sentence is bothering me. I have a child that has Autism & obsesses about things that other children her age wouldn’t even think of. You made a statement “Any child that demonstrates premature sexual interest simply reflects poor parenting.” Kids are curious. I work for a public school, and believe me, kids are curious at all ages. My child became very fascinated with the human body and how it works. Reproduction is a part of that. We have spoken to her physicians and therapists. We have used every parental form of internet/tech security you could imagine! Everyday a new search engine or site becomes available that isn’t going to be blocked by these security measures until you notice the site and add it to the list, or it flags itself once site is opened. I am a good Mom. A damn good Mom. I make mistakes just like every other parent out there, but I feel it is wrong to state ANY child when you don’t know the circumstances as to why a child shows premature sexual interest. It isn’t always poor parenting. I promise you it isn’t.

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    • Um. Hold up. I am well under the age of 40, also a former LPN, who now controls all of the marketing, social media, and accounting for a successful business. I am alllll up in my 8 year old’s business and will be until the day she moves out of my house. The difference between us though is that my husband is a veteran cop who is also currently kicking ass over in Afghanistan. Let me tell you something, when you have to listen to your big bad husband come home shaken because a little girl around the same age as his was found in a ditch somewhere, crying and bleeding because a group of girls thought that her instagram picture was too cute and their “boyfriends” might like her better, so they threw rocks at her and laughed the whole time. They never commented on said picture so all the helicopter momming in the world wouldn’t have helped. Not to mention the 12 year old girl who was targeted (also on instagram) by a friend from school’s dad who had seen her picture on his son’s instagram…ya know, from being a hella good parent and keeping a close eye on what his son was doing. I can give you at least 20 more examples of things like this. Things that have happened directly as a result of kids having a smart phone that no amount of your excellent parenting skills could have prevented. ALSO. Those harrowing accounts of children saving lives by having a smart phone?? All of that could have been accomplished with a plain Jane flip phone with no frills. So, this educated 32 year old will just stick to my “hell no, you’re too young for a smart phone and don’t ask me again until you’re 16” rule. And you my dear, may want to get off your judgement all high horse 😐

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    • I hope you learn to spell and punctuate before you graduate law school. Your cavalier attitude toward standard writing conventions makes it all too easy to dismiss any valid points you may have made. As for your contention that there are studies that contradict these findings, I’d love for you to actually cite one. You’ve provided nothing but your own poorly written anecdotal narrative.

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    • hmmm… and none of your degrees taught you how to spell cavalier?

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    • Did you just spout out your educational accomplishments while bashing people you know nothing about merely because you have already given your child a cell phone? I think it is fine to disagree, but this level of attack is very unattractive and says little about the parents you condemn but speaks volumes about the content of your character. This just drips with insecurity. Drip. Drip.

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    • I was glad to read your post. I also have a 8year old who has a smartphone (while he just turned 9). He is a straight A student and gets at least 10 hours of sleep a night. He is also a great precentage on the growth chart for age and height. He loves to climb trees, go on bike rides, and play soccer with his friends. The main reason he got a phone is because my husband works night alot and I have some pretty severe medical conditions and we wanted to get him a phone that he is comfortable with and knows how to use so if he has to call 911. We only have our mobile phones and no land line. Even though there are reasons we got him one it seems like everyone is juding me so I was really glad when I read your comment.

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      • Cell phones are fine, but don’t give them a 50 dollar phone.

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    • Because the only professionals that count are you and those who agree with you.

      Every parent has their special child for whom things don’t apply.

      Ok. If I give you that she is perfect with her cell phone, I wonder why you would leave your child with a person that you can’t trust. A person that you either have to monitor every minute, or make sure that your child has a cell phone because they might do something to them. It would seem more safe to stay at home with them.

      Same things can happen at school too… and they aren’t going to make an exception for your child and let them keep their cell on them throughout the day.

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    • Elizabeth for someone who claims to be so educated, your writing skills could use a little work. I had to read through your post 3 times for most of it to make any sense at all.

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    • You do what you want with your kid, but most internet sites are 13 and up. if I catch your kid online because Mama wants to break rules I will be the first to report them. Good day to you and don’t think that your precious can get away with breaking rules. You just made them into a spoiled brat, I hope you are proud of that as well.

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    • Maybe you should tell Bill Gates this.Your “accomplishments” will surely convince him to change his stance.
      I agree with proactive parenting; but, the tone of your response is more apt to turn others away then actually encouarge or educate them.
      Having two teens myself, I find smart phones unnecessary. That is a personal preference for our family. No judgement passed here on others. As an educator I also find that experience is just as valuable, sometimes more so, than ONLY education.
      I personally learned more teaching at a child development center than in a majority of my college education classes. By the way, I attended a private college in a major city “known” for its excellent education department.
      We all have to remember that there is more than one way to raise our kids in a good way.

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    • Anytime you make a general statement such as parents over 40 is a harsh, presumptuous thing to do. I know many responsible people under 40 as well as over 40.

      Being a responsible adult is what we are all trying to do if it works in your world to empower your child with a smartphone at young age because your child is naturally responsible more power to you! Consider yourself lucky with possibly a sprinkling of your parenting skills.

      Both of us over 40 and many under 40 are still trying to just do what’s best for our child because they need to be explicitly taught how to be responsible with the hopes of when they’re adults they instill those values and morals that we hope we are instilling along their youth path.

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  7. No one in our house has their own smartphone before their senior year in high school. My kids see and talk to friends enough. We have a computer that they use at home in our kitchen where everyone is aware of what is being viewed and how much time is being spent on them. Technology is great if used in the right ways. It is just what we do, every parent has to make that choice for their own children. When I go out and see people in their own little worlds looking at a screen instead of communicating with each other it makes me sad. Just my two cents worth…

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  8. I FOR ONE THINK 8TH IS TOO SOON. FOR GIRLS 15 IS THE AGE THEY SHOULD DATE. THEY NEED A PHONE IN CASE THE GUY IS A JERK AND SHE NEEDS TO GET A RIDE HOME. BUT ONLY FOR DATES. AT 16 WHEN THEY GET A DRIVERS LICENSE THEN THEY NEED A PHONE TO CALL IN CASE OF EMERGENCY WITH THE CAR. NOT TO TEXT OR ANYTHING ELSE. KIDS THESE DAYS ARE TOO IMMATURE TO UNDERSTAND THE CONSEQUENCES. THEY ARE FORCED TO GROW UP TOO FAST.

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    • I tend to agree, I want a flip phone for emergencies but don’t want a smart phone for my kids until they are at least 16/17.

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  9. Today’s technology is a love/hate relationship. Schools are making parents put the internet in their kids hands 24 hours a day just to be able to do assignments and submit them to the teacher via the internet. Kids no longer have a real need for paper and pencil/pen anymore because the majority of their work is done via the internet. Because of this fact, it is impossible to put an age limit on when kids are aloud to have access to technology. What the teachers don’t accomplish at school with the students has to be done outside of the classroom and turned back in via the internet to the teacher for a grade.

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    • This is great but not all areas do this… very few do…. I am a teacher and my district does not allow it… as a mother, I am very happy.

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    • Then why did I just spend over $100 on school supplies (as required by teachers) for my Freshman grand? Because they don’t need those pens, pencils, binders and paper???

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  10. I agree with this I didnt have one til I started driving and didnt have a data plan til I could pay for it. Now I have a 5 year old and I plan the same.

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  11. We don’t have a house phone so when my husband and I go out there was no way for our kids to call for help if needed. Our 12 yr old got a cellphone to babysit and as payment. It doesn’t have a data plan and had data turned right off by the company so it couldn’t be accidentally used. I don’t know why people are so afraid to give their kids a cellphone. Like it’s going to harm them in some way. Be a parent and put down the rules for it and follow through on punishment. If you can’t parent your kid then that’s a bigger problem than a cellphone. My daughter is turning 16 and still has the same cellphone and plan on it. She knows it’s not her phone it’s mine and if she wants a better phone or data put on in she needs to buy it herself.

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  12. Yes…keep them away from modern technology that will clearly be the future of their livelihood and make sure they are in the dark about all things in this world to prepare them for adulthood…good luck with that…unfortunately it is not 1980 something and this is what our kiddos will have to navigate and by keeping them from it certainly is positive and productive parenting. How about discussing the appropriate way to use modern technology ? hmmmm that’s just crazy talk :/

    Side note…kids are WHAT??? having to use technology to do school assignments??? pen and paper? no cursive handwriting? what are we to do? I had a friend that was astonished that our kiddos weren’t learning the dewey decimal system or how to write a check…REALLY? why? they don’t need it just like we didn’t need how to light a candle to do our homework by chalkboard. Embrace it …it’s here and will only continue. Quite frankly it’s embarrassing. YES to end my rant my 11 year old has a smartphone so I can find her when I need to so that she can go out and play with freedom but less parental fear. My 10 year old has Gizmo for the same. Embrace it. xo

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    • Right, and when the grids go out some day all that stuff kids learned on the smartphones and computer wont amount to a hill of beans, because they wont have some form of technology to help them out. That is my two cents, and yes I still remember the Y2k scare and maybe just maybe it will take more than just a scare to make all these egotistical people understand that sometimes change is not for the best.

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  13. I can’t add much as to the age of a phone. I can suggest the phone may not be the issue. The issue may be finding new ways to engage in real face to face conversations. I just found this game and carry it where ever I go. I travel all over every city where I work and play. I use this in schools and have found it to be an incredible gift for any group, regardless of age, socio-economic status, country of origin and all those other labels.

    I look for solutions rather than debate individual choices based on people’s real world experiences. So, enjoy:http://gladyouaskedgame.com/

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  14. I found it sad how all of the comments are so judgemental of each other. If you feel strongly against your child having a cellphone with data, fine. If you feel it’s ok for your 5 year old, fine. We all have our own thoughts and opinions. There are well developed homeschool kids just like there are well developed public school. There are over sheltered homeschool and public school kids. There are kids who struggle in both venues. Parents have to make the decisions that are best for their kids and their family. What works for one family doesn’t work for another. What works for one child in the family doesn’t necessarily work for another child in the same family. Parents do need to be vigilant when it comes to their kids. Even though most vigilant patent can miss things though. Even their kid can wind up as a screwed up adult. Respect each other. When it comes to technology, we are ask trying to figure out how to best parent with it in our kids lives. Things have changed drastically even over the past 5 years. Stop being so judgemental.

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    • Thank you for your wise words here!

      Be wise, do the best you can with the knowledge you have and don’t judging others. Agree to disagree. Things are constantly evolving and that isn’t going to change. We just can’t compare recent, let alone past, years with now. Too much is changing too quickly. We might have all survived without them, but that’s not the world we live in today. We all have to find our own happy medium for our families. Wishing everyone the best in that!

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  15. If you have boundaries and set expectations and then follow thru if those expectations are not meet a 6th or 7th grader can handle a smart phone.

    If a child is waking up in the middle of the night then of course they are not ready for a a phone. If they are purposely seeing porn on their phones of course take it away.

    A blanket no phone til 8th because blah blah blah is a parent taking the easy way out.

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  16. Well I disagree 100% but that’s why my 10 year old had a smart phone at 7. This world is all about technology, even his teaches are requiring communication and hw through apps. I want him to have an advantage of knowing how to navigate through the internet without buying into everything he reads. How to research things he likes and wants to do. Answer questions I don’t know the answer to. Everything is addicting, teaching moderation is the answer, not depriving them of the knowledge the smart phone has to offer.

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  17. I got my first cell phone sometime in my early 20s. My parents never paid $0.01 toward any cell phone or service I used. I got my first smart phone at age 44. The sales person couldn’t figure out how to NOT finance at least part of the phone over 24 months, so I still owe $0.04 on it.

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  18. um, tablets anyone??? so no phones but ok with tablets? tablets do the same thing with sleep patterns – all electronics should be turned off 45 mins before bed and left downstairs/not in their rooms. my kids get phones in 6th grade. that is when they start riding the bus and i no longer drive them to grade school. i need to know if they miss the bus so i can go get them. i have 1 kid with a phone and 2 with tablets. the kid with a phone uses her tablet more than her phone. she mostly uses the phone to play pokemon with me and her younger brother. so i find this a little ridiculous. if you are going by wait until 8th – it should be for all electronics. tablets are basically bigger phones.

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    • My girls have Kindles, but they don’t do anything online, and we downloaded the games on there ourselves, so we know what they are playing.

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  19. My boys had to get straight “A”s throught 8th grade. And then they could have a phone.

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  20. I have a 16 year old with a old school flip phone. That’s all she needs.

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  21. my kids got cel phones when they got jobs and could pay for them ! and the y monthly bill each month

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  22. Then there’s the public schools that have “6th grade centers” that only use iPads and no “real text books”! I can’t even believe it – 6th grade!!!!!!

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    • Something the “pro-technology” parents seem to be ignoring: parenting style aside, there is actual scientific evidence proving how damaging technology is for young kids! It’s not simply a matter of “my kid has a smartphone and they’re fine”. That proves absolutely nothing. If you THINK it’s fine, great- maybe you have a great kid and great parenting skills and your kid will be ok. But let’s not ignore the scientific evidence please! There are countless new studies pointing to the long-term damaging effects of technology that have NOTHING to do with how good a parent you are (or how educated you are). It’s not hard to do the research: just google, or read a newspaper! It seems unwise to get defensive when the scientific evidence contradicts your own choices. We can’t ignore science just because we don’t want to feel badly.

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  23. In our house you can have a cell phone when you get a job and pay for it. No if’s and’s or but’s.

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  24. My son is and has been a kid since he got his smartphone after 5th grade. It came with rules and responsibilities. It enabled me to call and say come home for dinner instead of driving around the block to see whose house they ended up playing basketball or riding skateboards at. It enabled him to go fishing at the creek in 7th grade with his friends and I could call him when it was time for baseball. If he is ever in an uncomfortable situation, he can text me “x.” I will know the “x” means I go extract him. He has dyslexia and his cell phone enables him to “talk-type” book reports and listen to audio-books, check his grades and get assignment reminders from teachers. I can see what apps he uses. I can limit, block, and restrict times. I can read his texts. He will always answer when I call. He will always respond when I text. It is, first and foremost my phone, on my account, that I pay for and he uses, as I permit. “His” phone is a privilege that comes with responsibilities or the privilege will be taken away.

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  25. My children are 10, 13 and 16. They have had phones since they were 9 and at 10 got iPhones… I monitor their activity and for the younger 2 have the ability to set on/off times for use. I can see on my acct who they are calling and if their browsing history is deleted, WiFi and internet get suspended. They have been active in sports and after school activities for years and I can’t always be there.. I won’t depend on another to fo what they need to to get in touch with me. iPhones allow me to track them. I haven’t regretted it.

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  26. What is great about this article is it is asking parents to support each other with waiting and giving those kids a peer group. It’s not telling anyone to do anything and yes for each wait article there is an it’s ok article. As a parent we each have to decide what is best for our kiddos. Let other parents do the same, decide what is best for their kiddos. Can’t we be kind and supportive even if we differ in opinions?

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  27. I got my twin 14 year old daughters a flip phone in 7th grade after a friend’s parents forgot to pick them up at our local sportplex. They were going to have a sleepover with their friend but all 3 were stranded and all of which were too scared to ask a stranger to use their phone.

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    • To add to what I said. They weren’t allowed any computers or handheld devices until they got school issued ipads and that they could use other than a basic cable tv and a so that they could play a video game

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  28. I didn’t have cell phone until I went away to camp in 6th grade, but I didn’t get a smartphone until I was a freshman in college😅. It seems like a good idea to wait tbh, I’ve shattered the glass on my phone at least three times as a full blown adult. I can’t imagine handing it to a smaller me.

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  29. I grew up before cell phones,and our only phone was in the kitchen. So, if I wanted to talk to my girlfriend, I had to do it in the kitchen in front of everyone! My children aren’t getting cell phones until high school, if it is up to me.

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  30. Yes! There are shootings and terrorism and other very very big things to worry about but, by all means, lets worry about “banding” together to stop parents from giving kids a smart phone until their 13? versus what? when their 10? good god people……. You don’t want someone telling you how to punish or reward your child but you want every single adult on this planet to not give their child a smart phone until 13 years of age. Noone cares. This is probably the stupidest thing ive ever encountered and read. Put your powers and “BAND” to good use.

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  31. I am in fourth grade and i have a phone and i have it to connect with friends, and family. Also i swim on a swim team and when my parents or sisters or brothers need to get in contact how will they do that if i don’t have a phone? No one except swimmers are aloud on deck so the won’t be able to. I have had a phone since 2nd Grade because that’s when i started to swim and now i’m in 6th Grade and I can still function and get an A+ when i’m in all advanced classes.

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    • This is my favorite comment! I’m glad you’re letting these people see that kids are pretty smart and can handle technology as well or better than adults can. I love that your post has many fewer grammatical errors than the adults’ comments.

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  32. Which Silicone Valley Executives?

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  33. The fact remains that like everything else, we introduce and use first, and then study later. We don’t know for certain how all of this technology affects the neuroplasticity of our brains, but we do know as adults that screens, clicking, liking and all of this instant gratification is addictive. Children’s brains are still developing and different than adult brains.

    Basic phones with call and text features are understandable for some kids, but kids don’t NEED apps and constant internet at the tips of their fingers and bright addictive screens in their faces at young ages. They aren’t missing out on anything. Please heed the advice of this article and think twice about smart phones for young children.

    We may not be able to reverse damage or rewire the brain at a later point in time. I don’t want my children to be sociology or neurology experiment.

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  34. While I appreciate the perspective of this article, I disagree. Here’s why. First I have three boys 10, 8, 7. In my house our boys gravitate towards my oldest son, naturally. They want to be like their older brother, much like many younger siblings. My point being, keeping your kids from naturally gravitating towards other kids, older younger etc is impossible. They will go to friends houses and be on their friends phones, they will be at school and do the same. It’s impossible to keep them from the content that they want to see and keeping it from them will only make their mission that much stronger when they aren’t in your company. So, in our house we talk and we talk a lot. Their ipods are not theirs, they are my husbands and mine. Yes they may the color they picked out and house the games they wanted to download, however they are not theirs. They are loaded with software that tracks their every move, something my husband I researched and paid to have installed. Their every search, is monitored and if they want to explore something like instagram or facebook, they use my account. This teaches them limits. It allows them to explore however it teaches them the boundaries that kids their age should be exploring within. I always felt bad for those kids in college who showed up and went crazy partying like they were just let out of a cage for the first time in their life. Most of those kids didn’t see their sophomore year and not because they didn’t have the intellectual intelligence to get them through, rather they lacked the emotional maturity to make good choices. Keeping your kids from a smartphone is only showing them that you don’t trust their ability to make good choices. Allowing your kid to make choices now can result in small problems with teachable solutions, rather then eventually letting go and watching them make choices that will result in large problems with little to no solutions. In this day and age, parenting needs to go beyond the fear of what if and focus instead on the solution of what if.

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  36. For all the judging folks, what if your child has a life threatening chronic illness? The school nurse is out and the office doesn’t agree that you need to be aware. Substitute teacher not aware of the medical protocol in place for said child. Teacher is just having a hard day and her head just isn’t in it. Your child has.. a severe allerfix reaction. Or a bad asthma attack. Or a very low blood sugar. That child NEEDS a phone in these instances to call YOU. I know of children whose ambulance rides to the ER could have been avoided…if they had a cell in class.

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    • There are exceptions to every rule. Here, the point is smart phones, not necessarily cell phones in general.

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  37. Does a happy dance. Ive been saying this for awhile now. All the things
    that can be said about a smart phone can also be said about the internet in general
    here are more reasons to add to the list, makes a child lethargic, adds to mental and physical health problems,
    causes anti social behavior, exposes a child to online
    stalkers and pedos, makes a child not want to use cursive, children
    use a lot more shorthand because of the internet. Im glad someone else is noticing this.

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  38. There was a story about an 8 year old kid that drank boiling water cause she saw it on youtube. things like that would be less frequent if a kid does not have access to the internet.

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  39. *Clap Clap Clap* I’ll have you know that electronic devices are not all that terrible! I do admit that I spend lots of time on them but it makes me happy! You mothers need to run along back to the kitchen. Times are changing and if I want to have a phone then too bad so sad for you! And i’ll let you know that even though I have a cell phone and i’m under 18 my IQ is 127 BAM WHAT! And I still have a phone that connects to the internet. Oh and btw not all children use their phone to look up things on the internet that may be inappropriate! Idiot humans.

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    • “Harry potter” Are you aware of how totally your post missed the point?? There is scientific evidence proving how damaging technology is for young kids- there have been many, many studies, it’s not just a matter of opinion! IQ has LITERALLY NOTHING to do with it. Did you even read the article?

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      • I’m not following some stupid pledge! You adults would just rather that we play outside instead of chat with friends. Well to bad so sad! My life is on Amino!

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  40. what about ipads in the elementary school? With the data about addiction….

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  41. No pledge is going to stop me from going online! Amino apps is my home!

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  42. We agree at imbullyfree.org. parents should really look at PRI and cons of giving their children a cell phone with internet access. You may have just invited the world to bully your child

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  43. I agree and really like this article however it misses an important point.

    There is a legal notice in every cell phone about RF exposure. Phones should be held at a distance away from a body/tissue.

    There is a lot of information on RF exposure and negative biological affects. Hopefully you can add thisnto your article.

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    • Nobody hold the phone to their head anymore…. it’s all texting now.

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  44. I am 24 years old…(aka, not ancient, lol)…I got my first cell phone in I think my junior year of high school. There really wasn’t any need prior to that point. If I was at an after school activity with an unknown end time, guess what, every school is equipped with multiple phones, often with some specifically dedicated to student use only. Other activities have defined end points, and guess what, my friend’s houses were also equipped with phones whether land lines or cell. And once I had my license, I borrowed my mom’s phone when I left and used it to call my dad’s phone when I arrived at my destination. As a high school student it wasn’t like I was driving across the country or anything where I needed my own phone. When I did get my own phone, the primary reason was that my mom was going to be working more and so we needed another phone in the family so she could bring hers to work and I could still drive where I needed to go and check in when I arrived…and probably also to get me used to the responsibility of being a phone-owner so I’d be ready when I went away to college.

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  45. Lots of virtue signaling going on in this comment section. And lots of triggering, too. It’s possible to disagree on a topic and be exposed to other opinions without having your precious ego bruised.

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  46. I don’t even have a Smartphone as an adult! I spend way too much time online when I’m home. I don’t need that temptation when I’m out and about. I got my first cell phone in my 20’s when I paid for it myself. Somehow, I got through life just fine without it.

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  47. After much debate, my husband and I got our daughter a smart phone when she went into the 6th grade (middle school). Thank God we did…during the first week of school she was not dropped off at her grandmother’s house out in the country twice and the bus driver yelled at her to sit down when she tried to tell him. Luckily she had her phone and called her daddy who was able to track her down through the GPS and stop the bus to retrieve her! The schools response was “It’s no big deal, we would have dropped her off at the high school if you had not tracked down the bus”. NOT OK. A 10 yr old with unattended high schoolers after the instructional day is over!?!? We have all her passwords, monitor her browsing and data, make phones a no no at the dinner table, and constantly remind her of phone/web safety. BTW, she is a straight A student, on academic team, swim team, drama, govenors cup, band, chior,4H shooting sports, and a Christian. Responsible parenting is the key! I’m 44 and yes, we grew up without cell phones, but we also knew where pay phones were and could walk into any store or knock on just about any neighbors door to use the phone or get help. Now, the school doors are locked at all times and kids are unable to re-enter to use the phone to call parents. Again, it’s all about responsible parenting!!!

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  48. My parents rule was that we could have a cell phone once we were able to pay for it ourselves. I still didn’t get one until I was 21, after I had served an LDS mission. Only one out of five of my siblings has one, and yes, she has a job and pays for it herself.

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  49. In my own opinion, there’s nothing wrong with smartphones. So what if kids are using them? I have gone to many different places, in many different states, and I have seen more ADULTS on smartphones, rather than teenagers. I use my smartphone a lot, because I have many friends, whom I enjoy conversating with. Also, smartphones isnt what affects teenagers sleep, teenagers have always had issues with sleep because they’re either depressed, insomniac, or they’re just not tired. If you’re going to say that cyber bullying is an issue, then put some laws against cyber bullying, don’t blame the phones. Also, teenagers don’t have to have a phone to be exposed to sexual content, there is several magazines and tv shows with porn on it, besides, wouldn’t you prefer masturbation over them just having sex every night with everyone and catching diseases?

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  50. It is the ignorant parents who give cell phones to their young children–I guess a way to not interact with them in real life.

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  51. I don’t think smart phones are necessary at all, they can have a cheap ‘burner phone’ for emergencies and for research for schoolwork, they can use the home computer or library’s computers. We limit ‘screen time’ to Friday, Sat and Sunday and then max 1.5 hours per day. The rest of the time, they use their imaginations, play, build forts, swing outside, play with the dog, build lego and draw, all the things we did as kids 🙂

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  52. I don’t understand why parents need to make a pact with other parents (who may be strangers to them) to determine when to give their child something. YOU ARE THE PARENT. You make the decisions for your child. If you don’t want them to have a smartphone, don’t give them one! It’s not a necessity like food or clothing. It seems parents are just as susceptible to peer pressure as their kids. Just because all their friends have a smartphone doesn’t mean your child needs one.

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  53. I have no intention of giving my kids smartphones before their teenage years, and I have no intention of participating in this silly pledge. It’s nobody’s business what you decide in this regard. This smacks of a bunch of uppity hausfraus (read that as WHITE – check out those pics on the fb page!) who want everybody on the bandwagon so it’s EASIER for them to parent. Parent from your living room, not from your bully pulpit.

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  1. Friday link roundup 8/11 | closertohappiness - […] A parents’ movement to wait until high school to allow their children to have cell phones. […]

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